WALTONS DIGEST 23-2000:

Hi everyone,

As I've been telling you for the past few weeks, I am finally on school holidays. Mine started on Friday, because I only work part time (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday). It's been great weather so far, but this time of year we really can't expect that to last. I intend to have a restful time (apart from driving James to his social engagements!) but still have a lot of school stuff to do. Still I hope it will be restful. :-))

I will be changing email addresses sometime in the near future. Cable connection has come our way, and we have just had it installed yesterday. It's downloading things very quickly and seems a much better way to access the internet. Needless to say though, we've had to move to a different ISP.

I have managed to get all of the past digests up to date again, and onto the site, so if you want to catch up you can go to:

In the last digest we had some comments about the final 2 seasons and because of this I asked "Interesting comments about the quality of the series in the final seasons. Which episode do people prefer out of seasons 8 and 9?"

I thought I would just let you know that I really enjoy The Valediction (season 8), especially because of that last poignant scene where all the young Walton men head off to war. I also like The Lumberjack (season 9) which introduces Paul to Erin. I really liked the character of Paul, and it was good to see a new and more successful love interest for Erin, ignoring the fact that by the later specials (1963 that is) they had divorced. If you are nominating a favourite though, please discount A Decade of The Waltons, which was really a special.

As for my other question "What about your favourite Waltons couple? Who do you prefer and why? No doubt Grandma/Grandpa or Mama/Daddy would get most votes, but perhaps you could nominate others too." I think I would have to suggest Ben and Cindy. I think these two tend to pick up where Olivia and John leave off. The couple chose to stay on the mountain, even with Ben working with his Daddy in the sawmill. They began raising a family during the season, and they just seemed so in love and happy together. I guess we could even add that they eloped in the same way John and Olivia did. I suppose theirs seems a more traditional relationship with Ben working and Cindy homemaking. The other girls/wives have careers. Anyway what are your thoughts?

Talk to you all again next week.

Goodnight all,

Karen.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Hi Karen

I saw Ellen Corby in a movie with Doris Day and Gordon MacCrae (I think) called "On Moonlight Bay". She was the little boys teacher and has a few funny scenes.

Barbara

KAREN'S COMMENT: Since you mentioned this movie, I dragged out my tape last night and started watching it. Such pretty music. She looks so young doesn't she? It must have been made in the early 50's I think.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

I am getting back to Richard Thomas and show called "It's a Miracle". Here in this part of Florida it comes on PAX on Thursday and Friday nights at 8 pm. It is a one hour show with Richard Thomas as host. It is based on true stories of miracle that happen in people lives. You can read more about the show and Richard Thomas in the Web site: www.itsamiracle.com

He closes the show by saying "Good Night"! Just curious, has anyone else seen the show?

Bob

KAREN'S COMMENT: We've had a few comments about this show on the digest and it seems people are enjoying it. I've just visited the web site and there's a very good write up about Richard. Judging from comments on the website, people are loving the show.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Just wanted to let you know that there are still only colleges for women in Va. The names are Mary Baidwin College, Sweetbriar College, and Randolph Macon College at Lynchburg. I also believe that Bridgewater College is still all female also. These are all private colleges and are not state supported. Now a lot of the universities that are coed now used to be all female or male. Radford University, James Madison University, Mary Washington College, Longwood College, ---these schools were all female until thhe early seventies. I went to Radford Univ in 1977 and it had only been coed for a few years and it was only about thirty percent male. Now all of these schools are totally coed and the male female ratio is equal. Va also has quite a few colleges that used to be all male such as VMI, Washington and Lee, Randolph Macon College at Ashland, University of Virginia, Va Tech. Hampdon Sidney College which is is central VA is still all male. VA was a very old fashioned state until the seventies and then we had to change. I personally think we would have been better off the way we were but of course things have to change and we just have to make the best of it.

Thanks, Midge

KAREN'S COMMENT: I'm amazed that there are still all male or all female colleges around, although I'm sure many people probably prefer them. There has never been such a thing here in Australia, although there is a Catholic University. There probably isn't enough Universities here to enable them to open a more exclusive one.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Hello everyone !!

There are so many things I was going to add that I hope I can remember it all !! First, I want to mention that if you haven't checked out the TNN web site lately, there are some really interesting things there. Great pictures of the cast recording The Waltons Christmas CD!! Other good photos in an "album" they have ...

I believe that I saw that Jon was the "voice" of Christopher Robin in Winnie the Pooh . I remember seeing his name and then seeing or reading somewhere that, yes, that's him !! Unfortunately, I can't remember where? Also, I'm not sure what time frame he was doing this or for how long ??

And, Karen, I agree with you .. I do remember seeing the Walton men wearing their safety glassess in the mill ...!

It's hard to say who my favorite couple is ...there is something to admire about them all !! But, if I had to vote, I guess I'd say John and Olivia ... They had a challenge in that they had to strike a chord with two different generations ...Grandma and Grandpa and their children ... did that make sense ??

As I mentioned, there are probably things I'm forgetting ...I'll try to remember for the next digest!!

One last thing , Karen , my husband is sitting he while I write this and is wondering if you are Irish? He thinks you're last name sounds like an Irish name!

Sincerely, Judy

KAREN'S COMMENT: I can confirm that Jon Walmsley was the voice of Christopher Robin. In the last WIFC newsletter, there is a Q & A about it. Jon replies: "Yes...However, I was not the first one. [I'm assuming he means that he wasn't the first Christopher Robin.] I was eleven years old when I was invited to create the voice of Christopher Robin for the Academy Award winning featurette, "Winnie-the Pooh and the Blustery Day." There is a photo from the feature and it's autographed to Carolyn [Grinnell], by Jon.

BTW the name is Irish, although we are about 5th generation Australians. Rod's family originally came from County Tipperary, with all sides Irish. As for me, I have a little Irish blood, some Scottish, some English and some German.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Yes Jon Walmsley was the narrator of the Winnie the Pooh that they mentioned.

The ninth season contained several episodes that many viewers did not like. The Tempest and The Whirlwind were two episodes that sounded like a soap opera but we have to remember that even though Curt supposedly died at Pearl Harbor there never was a funeral or a memorial service. One possible explanation is that his dog tag may have fallen off-remember that there was widespread panic during the bombing and nobody was sure that there would not be a Japanese invasion following the bombing. In this widespread chaos and due to the fact Curt was totally knocked out, and he didnt wake up until sometime in April 1942 and it was not for several weeks or months after that that he finally remembered who he was.

As for the Pursuit, Kathy Seale(Jennifer Jason Leigh )did a wonderful job in playing the part of someone who was in love with a soldier because she was so lonesome for a good home life that she felt Jimbob would provide, From her story she didnt have a happy home life her parents were separated her father lived in New Jersey and her mother lived in or near Norfolk.

Jimbob wore goggles in several episodes.

Donald

KAREN'S COMMENT: It does seem odd that there was never a memorial service doesn't it?

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Hi Karen,

Just to say that DJ stands for Dinner Jacket - it is more common here in UK to say DJ than tuxedo (that is more an Americanism). Have a great two weeks off. I am off to Spain for a week early July then later in July will go to Northern Cyprus for a week. Then I have to wait until the Reunion in October before going away again. It's a hard life! Take care one and all.

Regards

Welsh Sue

KAREN'S COMMENT: Spain sounds nice. You're certainly doing a lot of travelling! Like you say, it's a hard life.

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Hello Everyone!

I saw a young Ellen Corby on PBS last Saturday night -- the 1949 color (we spell it without the u) version of Little Women. She was a maid and did not sound like herself. I only put it on my TV because there was nothing else to watch and it was time to sit a while and relax before going to bed. This one also had Peter Lawford, June Allyson, Judy Garland, Elizabeth Taylor, and Margaret O'Brien. I don't remember seeing it before -- wish I'd taped it for one of my granddaughters who'd have enjoyed it and will be visiting soon.

As always I'm interested by Karen's Australian information. It always makes me think of a lot of other things I'd like to know. I've wondered if there are any areas and cities known for specific types of manufacturing or industries like we have in the States, such as automobiles in the Detroit area, movies in California, theatre in New York City, the dairylands of Wisconsin, the banking industry in Wilmington, Delaware, just to name a few. We also have famous colonial seaports and cities; New Orleans with its Mardi Gras; large southern plantations; St. Louis, Missouri, known as the gateway to the West; there are the vast prairie lands; the huge deserts in the Southwest; Native Indian reservations, Eskimo villages in Alaska, the "old country" villages of the Pennsylvania Dutch and other similar people elsewhere, the Rocky Mountains in the West and the Appalachians in the East. Certain animals and birds are native to certain areas, too. My younger daughter spent over a year on Maui for her job and she was struck by the many similarities of the native customs there with those of the American Indians.

I've also wondered about food. In the US foods transported out of their area of origin seem to lose something on their journey; such as Philadelphia Cheese Steaks, lobsters of New England, crabs of the Chesapeake Bay area, Oriental foods moved out of their own neighborhoods, etc.

Another thing is regional accents and inflections in speech, and different words used to express things from one area to another. In our southern states, in eastern New England, and in Brooklyn, New York, they are quite different. And, I've noticed when speaking by phone with my friend in rural, far northern, England that her English has lost a lot of it's British accent. She never did speak "Geordie" but she can if needed to make herself understood in even more rural areas. We in the US have picked up a number of British phrases in recent years, as they have of ours. I've also noticed a difference in Canadian English in the areas not influenced by French Canadian. The Australian actors I've heard speak differently than any other people with English as their native language, and I've wondered if different areas in Australia use different words to express things.

"On holiday" means taking a trip to another place to us. "Time off" or "vacation" is used to mean days off from work or a job, and from school. Also, vacations may be day trips to somewhere nearer to home. "The Holidays" refers to the days from December 23rd through January 1st, and sometimes means from Thanksgiving (the 4th Thursday in November) through January 1st. Often the Thanksgiving holiday has been made a four day weekend by most large employers because schools have a four day weekend and people tend to travel to see family before the snows come to the northern states. We have three day national "holiday weekends" for Presidents' Day in February, Memorial Day the end of May, Labor Day (the first Monday in September) and for Columbus Day in mid October. Independence Day is always on July 4th but it is even more special when it happens to fall on a Friday or Monday, which makes another three day holiday weekend. At Easter most places give at least the afternoon of Good Friday and some give Easter Monday, too.

Schools have a "Spring Break" for a week, but not always at Easter if at its earliest or latest times. Universities often have a long winter vacation with a five or six week "Winter Session" of concentrated courses offered (not required to be taken) during January and into February. Most have two similar "Summer Sessions" June into August, also not required.

That is another language difference. Here a College is not school years 9 through 12, but is on the University level. Universities offer as many areas of study as they choose and each area is called a college within the University. There are also colleges of specific interest which are not part of a University, such as Liberal Arts colleges, performing arts colleges, visual arts colleges, Pharmaceutical colleges, Veterinary colleges, Culinary colleges, and other specialized colleges for specific vocations.

When referring to male formal attire here, "DJ" is a dinner jacket. It is the length of a regular suit jacket. A tuxedo is a jacket with tails. The dinner jacket and a less formal shirt is usually worn when a girl/lady wears a short evening gown, and the tux, with a cummerbund and fancier shirt, when she wears a long gown. Bow ties with both.

As for the last seasons and the six later specials of The Waltons, the authors must not have reviewed the previous seasons carefully enough to pick up correctly on things which they mentioned in their episodes. Continuity is the most noticeable thing, I think, that could have been improved to make this series of programs truly the all time best series ever on TV.

I liked John Boy's girlfriends before he went to Boatwright better than the others. I thought the girl they picked for his wife was all wrong for the real John Boy we all loved. Jason and Toni, of course, and Ben and Cindy were good together. I liked Erin with G W, too. But John and Olivia were my favorite couple of all.

I hope you are enjoying being "on holiday", Karen! Best wishes to all Waltonites.

"CJ"

KAREN'S COMMENT: Someone said in the digest recently that Australia and USA were so similar, yet so different, and they certainly are. We don't have really noticeable accent changes in regions of Australia, we're all pretty similar, although if you listen carefully you can pick up the odd difference. Australian children, who have parents from other countries, such as somewhere in Europe (very noticeable) but even Britain, often say some sounds differently.

Words are another thing altogether! Swimming costumes are a prime example. Here in Victoria we call them "bathers", New South Wales call them "swimmers" and other places call them "togs". I don't know what you call them! We have a "jug" of water, not a "pitcher" and we walk on the "footpath", not the "sidewalk". The storage space in cars here in Victoria is called a "boot", but other places in Australia call it the "trunk". There are all sorts of little differences like these. It's very interesting.

Colleges are interesting too. James goes to a private school, Aquinas College. Here colleges are for secondary education, years 7 to 12. We don't use sophomore, junior etc either...ever! Universities are tertiary education. Although we do have specific subject colleges, most are connected to Universities and are really just a faculty. Universities offer a broad range of degrees such as Arts, Science, Engineering, Performing Arts, Medecine, Law etc. Many courses now cover more than one faculty so you might do a degree with Arts/Law for example, or Commerce/Law. I believe though, that one huge difference is that we don't have a common first year at University. You have to choose which faculty you want before leaving Year 12, so we specialise very early.

As for industry, etc, I guess that's a hard one. The Yarra Valley area near us (we're actually just on the outskirts of the Yarra Valley) has become well known for its wines. King Island is making some terrific cheese and dairy produce, and Gippsland is also a well known dairy area. There are some parts of Melbourne that are very industrial. Up around the Murray River there are lots of fruit growing areas. Melbourne is known as the sporting capital of Australia and there are lots of world class sporting facilities. Although we don't have a theatre area akin to Broadway and the West End, there is talk of developing the theatre district of Melbourne into this sort of centre. Melbourne has some wonderful theatres, and many are being redeveloped. We have some terrific live theatre here. Sydney's theatres are too spread out to be developed in this way. Parts of Melbourne are also known for their cultural focus...China Town in the city centre, and Lygon Street which has a strong Italian focus.

Hope that answers a few of your questions CJ. It is interesting to compare. :-)

feather.gif (2653 bytes)

Hi Karen and Fellow Walton Fans,

I hope this message finds you all well. We have been having a heatwave here in the Bay Area of California.

I had a comment about the episode(s) when Elizabeth falls off of the log pile. In the 2nd part there is a scene which truly demonstrates Ralph Waite's fine acting ability. Do you remember the scene where John walks to the church to pray for Elizabeth's recovery? When he looks up at the church steeple, well his face and the expression in his eyes says it all. The pain of a father seeing his little girl suffer is written all over his face.

Ralph Waite is such a fine actor and I have often wished that he would be recognized more for his acting ability... even beyond his Walton fans.

Thank you again for this fine digest Karen. We enjoy it so.

Goodnight everyone,

Silvia

KAREN'S COMMENT: I hope to catch up with this episode during the holidays (or should I say, my vacation).

feather.gif (2653 bytes)